Saturday, January 10, 2015

2015 Want List

I was browsing my phone today when I stumbled across a list of wanted EDC items for 2014. It was nice to see that I landed two things that were left overs from 2013--the Yuna EQ-1 and the SPY 007. Unfortunately there were a lot of things I didn't land, but that merely gives me things to hunt down this year.  Here are my 2015 wants:

Lone Wolf/Benchmade 235

Image courtesy of Knife Center

Personal or Evaluation: Both

Why bother?

The Axial lock is a mechanism that has fascinated me for years.  The idea that a knife has a device that is: 1) the pivot; 2) the lock; and 3) the deployment method, all in a single piece, is really amazing. The design geek in me is just shocked at how efficient that is.  They have become increasingly harder to find and the 235 has just the right blade shape and is just the right size for my uses.


Image courtesy of Spydercollector.com

Personal or Evaluation: Evaluation

Why bother?

At around 1.8-1.9 ounces, the Jess Horn Lightweight is basically an Al Mar with all of the features I want--a pocket clip, better steel, and a thumb hole.  I wish Spyderco would re-release this knife or that Al Mar would make an ultralight with ZDP-189.  Until  either of those happen, I will be prowling the forums on the hunt. 

Kershaw Tilt

Image courtesy of Warrior Talk

Personal or Evaluation:  Neither...drool inducer (personal, really).

Why bother?

The Tilt, in many ways, is the knife that heralded the arrival of the KAI USA we know and love (which almost unanimously won 2014 Company of the Year).  Its lock bar stop is genius, the blade and handle are so unusual.  The steel is good.  And the liner cutouts spell out: "Tilt".  Who wouldn't want one of these?  Uncoated versions only, the blackout version need not apply.


Personal or Evaluation: Evaluation

Why bother?

The custom light world has been lacking.  The dearth of new designs and new makers is depressing, so when I found TacLites on Instagram I was intrigued.  I am waiting with baited breath for a review sample.  It would be nice to have another maker out there.  




Personal or Evaluation: Evaluation

Why bother?

LensLight has long been the preferred light of custom knife guys, which is sort of a backhanded complement.  They have the tacticool look and branding.  They have collaborations with Strider, TAD, and Starlingear.  These are all things that don't improve the light, but they do improve how a certain niche market SEES the light.  For me, its the things LensLights lack that always bump them to the bottom of the "Get for Review" list.  They don't have the performance or feature set of many of the even mid-tier flashlight brands and the focusing element calls to mind the MiniMag.  As between any LensLight and, say, an HDS the choice is simple. In terms of features, I'd much rather have a selector ring, a Hi CRI emitter, or a TIR optic, but instead we get "treated" to stuff like ZEDU digicam versions (okay, so its dark AND my one source of light is camoflagued...this sounds like some kind of ethnic joke set up line).  I also can't understand the use of delrin as a clip material or the lack of tailstanding options either.  The tailstanding option was added and I think I have fix for the clip so once the funds are there, I am going to pick one up for review and giveaway.  They look well made and the light's output looks clean, I just haven't been able to stomach all of the unnecessary BS AND the lack of even basic features (well, basic for a $250 light, hell the D25 AAA from EagleTac has a more impressive feature list, sans lumens/runtime numbers, and it is $30 shipped).  Maybe I am wrong and being too judge-y.  Time will tell.


Personal or Evaluation: Both

Why bother?

This is a clean watch, one that doesn't look like a dinner plate with dominos or a hockey puck on your arm.  Its also equipped with features that seem to have the potential to justify its price (note all of the hedging in that sentence).  The Co-Axial movement seems great.  The Aqua Terra also seems like a good place to tear into the higher end watch scene as there is some innovation here and not just gold or reputation.  And if I find it unrewarding I know I can recoup some of the cost by selling it.  

Personal or Evaluation:  Mine.  Mine, mine, mine.

Why bother?

Anso is the most original and creative custom knife maker working today.  I love the technical excellence and gadgety nature of a GTC knife, but in terms of pure cutting, the Anso designs I have handled are lightyears better than knives made by others.  I have no interest in the Millenium, as un Anso an Anso as I can imagine, but the Zulu, MoFo, and others make me reach for my wallet.  Anso is one of the last maker I have on my custom knife want list (though I wouldn't be sad if a Mayo landed in my pocket), so its just a matter of finding the right one at the right price.

Justin Lundquist Front Flipper


Personal or Evaluation: Evaluation

Why bother?

After GGL49 and Justin's praise for front flippers, I am intrigued by the idea and Justin's design is one of the cleanest out there.  The fact that he is an up and coming maker is also exciting.  He has no books, its all just getting lucky and being at the right place when he has something up for sale, but I am a patient person.  

Personal or Evaluation: Evaluation

Why bother?

Oveready/TorchLAB are basically the Saleen of the flashlight world--modding and tricking out good lights to make them world class spec monsters.  Their original light was something I absolutely loved and I wish I would have just bought the review sample.  Oh well.  Then they come out with a total revolutionary design for dissipating heat and a few minor tweaks to the Moddoolar form.  I want to see how all of these changes add up.  The idea of more than twice the lumens of my TX25C2 in a package the size of my HDS Rotary is pretty compelling.  
Image courtesy www.fpgeeks.com

Personal or Evaluation: Personal

Why bother?

Edison pens are a perfect mix of new maker and classic designs.  I got a Vanishing Point for Christmas and in a way I see the Edison as the young person rival, albeit in a more traditional form.  I am still trying to figure out which pen I want, but the arctic resin body will probably be my material of choice.  The VP is pretty fucking amazing as a writer, so the Edison will have some stiff competition.  

If you have any of the above (except the Edison, I want to break in the nib myself) and want to sell or trade, hit me up and we might be able to work something out.  I can be reached at everydaycommentary at gmail dot com (in the usual format). 

29 comments:

  1. Wow I never have seen that 235 before. That just about ticks everything I want.... Wish list...

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    1. I was thinking the same thing. I've been pretty bored with benchmade's offerings for several years now, but somehow I missed that 235. I've never seen it, but man that looks like a knife I would enjoy.

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  2. Vanishing Points are a gateway drug to fountain pens. I've been using them since the mid-90's. I'm now a pen addict.

    If you can hold off on the Edison, and if you're more open about the color, every July or August they offer a Limited Edition Group Buy where you get a choice of two pens in Ebonite or acrylic. I bought one this year (the LE Ebonite Glenmont) and it's a terrific pen.

    ps--Still enjoying the Ti Tactile Turn Shaker. I liked it so much I got a black anodized aluminum Mover from Massdrop.

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  3. Interesting list. I've been fighting the "want" bug, even though I know it's probably a losing battle! I've been really wanting a Seiko MM300 for a couple years now, but other things always get in the way. I'm a knife guy at heart, but my experiences with customs left me somewhat lukewarm to buying any more.The ones I owned (a couple from two very popular makers) were simply not as well made as the high end productions I've owned. Additionally, I cannot justify owning a collection of expensive pieces I'm afraid to use.One part of me wants to be a minimalist, but there's so many things I still want...
    Good luck on the hunt.

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  4. While the omega certainly looks nice, I think you'll be much more impressed by something like a sinn 856 or anything from nomos glashütte, sinn has amazing fewtures without much hype about in house movements, where nomos makes truly simplistic works of art, both externally and internally.

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  5. Lots of nice stuff. The Aqua Terra is gorgeous, and is an excellent choice. Nomos is a cool brand and they are cheap on the secondary, but I'd try out the Omega first, it will give a good frame of reference. I need to make a list.

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  6. The Bond watch! Its tough to love Omega, or to spend thousands on one given their recent advertising/production history and the competition. I suppose the co-axial movement is interesting. I suppose "clean" is a good description, but it looks like every other watch in the cases at Macy's to my eye. Maybe I'm just biased against Omega - overpriced celeb-ad driven generic watches is my gut feeling - though perhaps the co-axial movement really is worth it...

    I wear a vintage Omega Seamaster De Ville daily as my work watch (as in, more than any other watch), however, and I have a decent watch collection ranging from Casio to Patek. Clean, beautiful inside and out, cost in the hundreds, and historically interesting. Also a classic 34mm and extremely thin. Not great for all activities, but perfect for daily suit/formal wear. Prices went up with hipster demand, but maybe that has settled by now.

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  7. Can I ask what exactly about the co-axial movement impresses you? I'm really not trying to be rude, just trying to figure out where you're coming from. ALL Omegas are out of my price range, but there are a few I lust after. That said, I don't see the attraction to the aqua Terra.

    I posted this above, but thanks for bringing my attention to that benchmade 235. I had never heard of it before, but that thing is way up on my want list starting right now.

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    1. The basic thing is the improved accuracy.

      I get the Omega thing, but the reality is every single one of the those criticisms could be leveled against any one of the other major watch brands. They are all a bunch of charlatains. The IWC video is the most offensive thing I have seen in a while. It makes the Omega movie placement look downright Pollyanna.

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    2. Ah, the accuracy, I gotcha.

      I'm sure you're sick of hearing "suggestions" and "comments" about watches by now, but I'll throw another one out anyway. I think if you're going from not wearing a watch regularly to wearing one you will be surprised at how inaccurate a watch has to be before it bothers you. For example, if your watch is +10/day, you can set it once every 3 weeks and still not be off by more than 2 minutes.

      The reason I mention this at all is that this aqua Terra co-axial seems like a weird place to start this mechanical watch journey you have been on the verge of for awhile. Why not get something like the Bernhardt binnacle anchor, which seems similar in style, has great materials, and will save you thousands of dollars? Then you can decide if you're really into this mechanical watch thing before jumping into an omega.

      I will enjoy a review either way as I've never even held an omega despite lusting after them (esp the mkii).

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  8. Haha, charlatans indeed. Its interesting how consolidated the major players are, too.

    My G-Shocks all have the atomic clock function ("multi band 6"), where they receive the signal from Colorado every night. Can't get more accurate than that! If I look at my watch, I can say the exact moment my phone will advance a minute (which is expected).

    Co-axial seems sort of like a proprietary tourbillon - conceptually fascinating, and impressive in implementation, but how much practical benefit is actually there? All my automatics are pretty accurate, whether ETA, COSC certified, or anything else, and they all stop if they're not in the winding box.

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  9. +1 to Sinn or Nomos. Or vintage.

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  10. I have to admit that I was also surprised at the departure from a Sinn or similar to the Omega. Anyway, each to their own.

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  11. "Some of the cost." I don't know, Tony. Taking any percentage of a loss on something like that isn't really... Feasible. Start under a grand at least.

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  12. Have you looked at Damasko Tony? Their stairs nless steel bracelet is said to be an engineering marvel. I probably would have gotten one of those, instead of Sinn, if they made a smaller size.

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  13. I would do some more research before I spend that kind of money on the watch.
    Not that there's anything wrong with the AquaTerra, it's just that you would probably find better ones (for you) out there, especially in that price range. And don't get me wrong, I'm all for nice watches, but remember that about 1 month ago you were quite dismissive about automatic watches in general, and expensive ones in particular. No offense, but if you already consider selling the watch before buying it then you probably shouldn't buy it. I think you should only buy the watch that you WANT.
    Just my 2 cents. :-)

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  14. May I also recommend the Rolex Explorer 1 as an alternative. You will find the ability to recover more of your money if you're not married to the watch.

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  15. Looks like my other comment got eaten, so I'll repost the cliff notes version. I own the Aqua Terra reference mentioned above, and while it's a great watch, I think the slightly older model (non antimagnetic 8500) is a better value at this point. Also, the brushed center links on older AT's bracelet (vs polished on the new one) are more casual. Excellent used examples can be had, which will save you quite a bit off the MSRP.

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  16. Having found Justin Lindquist's work and fallen immediately in lust, I have to agree on this one. I too would love to own the one pictured in the article. I've communicated with him, and am waiting for my luck to come in. In the meantime, for a more accessible front flipper, you should find Clyde Challenor on Instagram. He has 3 models of front flipping folders, 2 of which are easily pocket-able edc Blades.

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